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because of that deposit tax component. now, the president is currently meeting with the leaders of the political parties. of course, what he's trying to do is to strong arm and to persuade them into voting for that deal because the other alternative, yes, that is bankruptcy for this country, which has only 1 million people and only makes up 0.2% of the entire eurozone. the debate and the vote on that bailout deal will be kicking off in around four hours from now at 4:00 p.m. local time. thou, a lot of uncertainty as to what the outcome of the vote will be, given that nobody has a clear majority. having said that, there is, of course, the chance that some of the lawmakers who have been wavering could have been appeased by the talk that some of the taxes for the smallest depositors could be lowered. now, "the wall street journal" has reported that those deposits between zero is and 100,000 euros could be taxed at only 3% as opposed to 6.75% previously. now, the middle bracket would be 100,000 to 500,000 euros. that could be taxed at 10% and then anything in excess of half a millio
meltdown. the parliament rejected an unprecedented tax on bank deposits. that was a key part of the eu bailout terms. the finance minister is in moscow today with mounting speculation that russia could step in with a safety plan to safeguard russian deposits in cyprus. steve sedgwick is in moscow where he caught up with the finance minister there an hour or so ago. steve? >> they turned to russians once again. there's a loan on the table from russians dating back from 2011 so it's not the exception to it the rule for the cypriots to turn to the russians. the russians themselves are indignant they weren't brought into talks. let's hear what he had to say earlier on about the state of the current talks. >> first meeting very constructive. very honest discussion. we underscored how difficult the situation is and we'll now continue our discussions to find a solution by which we hope we will get some support from russia. >> in terms of that support, are we talking about a change of terms for the current existing 2.5 billion euro loan and an extension of 5 billion loan in addition to that? >
. it will call for about $1 trillion in new revenues by closing tax loopholes and about 1 trillion in spending cuts at the same time but no structural changes to medicare and the question is will that get -- do either of these plans get anybody anywhere or is everyone talking to themselves? >> they're talking to themselves. we discussed it yesterday. in the last negotiations you still have the fact there are republicans who think that the republicans gave too much and then there are democrats who think that the democrats didn't get enough. so you have those clashing interests. >> i think what happened in january kind of derailed everything because by having these incremental advances instead of a grand bargain throws off the possibility that you do get the grand bargain. you see both sides digging in making sure they respond to their base saying the types of things that their base wants to hear. >> there's a good piece in politico. i don't know if you saw it that michael allen wrote that really sort of walks through why the grand bargain may never happen and i think -- i don't know if it's ben
,000 in the bank entirely to those under 100,000 and to keep the tax at 9.9% for those above 100,000 euros in their accounts. if it doesn't sound much different from the original plan, it's not. it basically exempts those with less than 20,000. on the back of that, we did see markets weak. elsewhere, there has been a weakening, but realively contained one. the ftse mib in italy is down 0.3%. the xetra dax is down by 0.5%. france is weaker. the ftse, as well, down about 0.25%. not too far off the levels we've seen this morning. german economic sentiment did come in roughly in line with expectations, so that helps to keep the bid in the euro, as well. here is the different between spain and italy. italy's ten-year selling off a bit. yield up to 4.66%. spain rallying. it did go to market with three nine-month yields this morning. still below 5%. i mentioned what was happening with the euro. let's take a look now as it continues to go through the different pieces of economic data we're getting this morning. it's still down about 0.11%. yesterday, it was actually stronger. so markets generally
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thought this was going to be a big heavy tax on consumers this year. >> the pump price was getting up there because the gasoline wasn't being made. we still haven't seen what might happen this summer. gasoline produces have never been as high in february as they were last year. so that's something to march. but the crude market had a lot of inches, the chinese economy looked like it was rip roaring in gdp dpoeth. and both of those were kind of head fakes at the beginning of the year. the chinese had new refining capacity, they're using it and pushing product out into the world market. >> we have been watching a lot of new production that's coming online in the united states. and people think that that could be the thing that really pulls us out, a new job creation, a new economic stimulus coming from energy. are you in that camp? >> actually i was among those who started that camp. i got on to that bandwagon pretty early. we think gdp could be by 2020 three full percentage points higher than it would be without the oil, the jobs created will be somewhere between 3 million and 4 millio
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6